The "missing" 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads as follows:

"If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them."

At the first reading, the meaning of this 13th Amendment (also called the "title of nobility" Amendment) seems obscure, unimportant.

The references to "nobility", "honour", "emperor", "king", and "prince" lead us to dismiss this amendment as a petty post-revolution act of spite directed against the British monarchy. But in our modern world of Lady Di and Prince Charles, anti-royalist sentiments seem so archaic and quaint, that the Amendment can be ignored. Not so. Consider some evidence of its historical significance: * First, "titles of nobility" were prohibited in both Article VI of the Articles of Confederation (1777) and in Article I, Sections 9 and 10 of the Constitution of the United States (1787); * Second, although already prohibited by the Constitution, an additional "title of nobility" amendment was proposed in 1789, again in 1810, and according to Dodge, finally ratified in 1819.

Clearly, the founding fathers saw such a serious threat in "titles of nobility" and "honors" that anyone receiving them would forfeit their citizenship.

Since the government prohibited "titles of nobility" several times over four decades, and went through the amending process (even though "titles of nobility" were already prohibited by the Constitution), it's obvious that the Amendment carried much more significance for our founding fathers than is readily apparent today. http://www.tomdavisbooks.com/library/13thamend.html#mean13 From the State of Maine Constitution Printed in 1825 http://www.uhuh.com/constitution/1825const.htm The Missing 13th Amendment Copy (yes, another one) http://loveforamerica.freeyellow.com/13th.html Analysis of the Real 13th Amendment This amendment was meant to keep citizens of the United States from accepting titles of nobility from foreign powers.

The best example of this would be honorary "knighthoods" given by the rulers of England to people around the world who have performed a service for humanity. http://www.vaix.net/~captainnemo/plan/ Esquire A title applied by attorneys to themselves, to officers of the court, to members of the bar, and others of ill repute. No one in the United States is entitled to it by law, and therefore, it confers, no distinction in law. In England, it is a title next above that of a gentleman, and below a knight. Camden records four kinds of esquires, particularly regarded by the heralds:

1. The eldest sons of knights and their eldest sons, in perpetual succession.

2. The eldest sons of the younger sons of peers, and their eldest sons in like perpetual succession.

3. Esquires created by the king's letters patent, or other investiture, and their eldest sons.

4. Esquires by virtue of their office, as justices of the peace, and others who bear any office of trust under the crown.

NOBILITY. An order of men in several countries to whom privileges are granted at the expense of the rest of the people. The constitution of the United States provides that no state shall " grant any title of nobility; and no person can become a citizen of the United States until he has renounced all titles of nobility." The Federalist, No. 84; 2 Story, Laws U. S. 851.

There is not in the (COUNTERFEIT DC DEFACTO UNITED STATES Corporate charter presented as a constitution) de facto constitution today [cf. US v USA: http://www.usavsus.info/ ] any general prohibition against any citizen whomsoever, whether in public or private life, accepting any foreign title of nobility. An amendment of the constitution in this respect has been recommended by congress, but it has not been ratified by a sufficient number of states to make it a part of the constitution.

Rawle on the Const. 120; Story, Const. _1346. The Court, in "Horst v. Moses", 48 Alabama 129, 142 (1872) gave the following description of a title of nobility: To confer a title of nobility, is to nominate to an order of persons to whom privileges are granted at the expense of the rest of the people. It is not necessarily hereditary, and the objection to it arises more from the privileges supposed to be attached than to the otherwise empty title or order. These components are forbidden separately in the terms "privilege", "honor", and "emoluments", as they are collectively in the term "title of nobility".

The prohibition is not affected by any consideration paid or rendered for the grant. The prohibition of titles of nobility estops the claim of eminent domain through fictions of law. Eminent domain is the legal euphemism for expropriation, and unreasonable seizure given sanction by the targets of this amendment. Here is the original 13th amendment to the United States Constitution that was ratified in 1819. Then attorneys caused it to disappear in order to establish their claim of superiority with Titles of Nobility over the people.

The total ramifications of this earlier 13th Amendment being unlawfully removed are very serious. Article 13, ratified in 1819, reads as follows: If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive or retain and title of nobility or honour, or shall, without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them.

The following states and/or territories have published the Titles of Nobility 13th Amendment in their official publications as a ratified amendment to the Constitution of the United States in the following years:

Colorado ------- 1861, 1862, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1967, 1868

Connecticut --- 1821, 1824, 1835, 1839

Dakota ---------- 1862, 1863, 1867

Florida ---------- 1823, 1825, 1838

Georgia --------- 1819, 1822, 1837, 1846

Illinois ------------ 1823, 1825, 1827, 1833, 1839, dis. 1845

Indiana ----------- 1824, 1831, 1838

Iowa --------------- 1839, 1842, 1843

Kansas ----------- 1855, 1861, 1862, 1868

Kentucky -------- 1822

Louisiana -------- 1825, 1838/1838 [two separate publications]

Maine ------------- 1825, 1831

Massachusetts -1823

Michigan -------- 1827, 1833

Mississippi ------ 1823, 1824, 1839

Missouri ---------- 1825, 1835, 1840, 1841, 1845*

Nebraska --------- 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861, 1862, 1873

North Carolina - 1819, 1828

Northwestern Territories --- 1833

Ohio --------------- 1819, 1824, 1831, 1833, 1835, 1848

Pennsylvania --- 1818, 1824, 1831 Rhode Island ---- 1822

Virginia ---------- 1819 (ratification by 13th State)

Wyoming -------- 1869, 1876

Totals: 24 States in 78 separate official government publications. http://www.outlawslegal.com/answers/esquire.htm